config

This page contains tutorials about the config package.

Creating a configuration file with a single variable

The entry point to the config module is the config.manager.ConfigManager class. This class is effectively a representation of your configuration file in Python. It allows you to perform a number of operations to your config file. You can add console variables as well as commands to execute. The config.manager.ConfigManager class will also place information about each console variable in a comment block above the actual variable. Here is an example script that creates a configuration file called addon.cfg in ../cfg/source-python/. This configuration file contains a single variable called addon_player_damage which defaults to 64:

# =============================================================================
# >> IMPORTS
# =============================================================================
# Source.Python Imports
#   Config
from config.manager import ConfigManager
#   Cvars
from cvars.flags import ConVarFlags

# Create the configuration file.
addon_config = ConfigManager('addon')

# Modify the header of the entire configuration file.
addon_config.header = 'Addon configuration file.'

# Create a console variable to add to the configuration file.
addon_player_damage = addon_config.cvar(
    'addon_player_damage', '64',
    'How much damage to cause to each player.', ConVarFlags.CHEAT
)

# Write the configuration file out to the folder.
addon_config.write()

And here is the resulting addon.cfg file:

// ######################################################################### //
//                         Addon configuration file.                         //
// ######################################################################### //

// Default Value: 64
// How much damage to cause to each player.
   addon_player_damage "64"

Adding additional documentation to console variables

The config package allows you to write in additional information about a given console variable. These appear as a header comment section above the variable. The following example script adds a comment block above addon_player_damage called Description:

# =============================================================================
# >> IMPORTS
# =============================================================================
# Source.Python Imports
#   Config
from config.manager import ConfigManager
#   Cvars
from cvars.flags import ConVarFlags

# =============================================================================
# >> IMPLEMENTATION
# =============================================================================

# Create the configuration file.
addon_config = ConfigManager('addon')

# Modify the header of the entire configuration file.
addon_config.header = 'Addon configuration file.'

# Create a console variable. Note that this returns a
# _CvarManager instance which I can then add additional
# lines of text to. Note: This actually creates the
# console variable.
addon_player_damage = addon_config.cvar(
    'addon_player_damage', '64',
    'How much damage to cause to each player.', ConVarFlags.CHEAT
)

# I want to add some extra documentation for this variable.
# This creates a comment block called 'Description' right above
# the console command.
addon_player_damage.Description.append(
    'Here is additional documentation on addon_player_damage.')

addon_player_damage.Description.append(
    'Even more documentation.')

# Write the configuration file out to the folder.
# Any values modified by the server administrator will
# remain unchanged.
addon_config.write()

Which results in the following configuration file:

// ######################################################################### //
//                         Addon configuration file.                         //
// ######################################################################### //

// Description
//   * Here is additional documentation on addon_player_damage.
//   * Even more documentation.
// Default Value: 64
// How much damage to cause to each player.
   addon_player_damage "64"

Couple of key takeaways from this example:

  1. The config.manager.ConfigManager.cvar() and config.manager.ConfigManager.command() methods return objects which you can add string fields to. These fields get written as comment blocks above your console variable.
  2. A server operator can change the default values in the configuration file. These changes will remain even if you call config.manager.ConfigManager.write().

Adding sections

Adding sections to your configuration file is extremely simple. Just call the config.manager.ConfigManager.section() method. You can also pass in a character to use in order to create the section boundaries:

# =============================================================================
# >> IMPORTS
# =============================================================================
# Source.Python Imports
#   Config
from config.manager import ConfigManager
#   Cvars
from cvars.flags import ConVarFlags

# =============================================================================
# >> IMPLEMENTATION
# =============================================================================

# Create the configuration file.
addon_config = ConfigManager('addon')

# Modify the header of the entire configuration file.
addon_config.header = 'Addon configuration file.'

# Create a console variable. Note that this returns a
# _CvarManager instance which I can then add additional
# lines of text to. Note: This actually creates the
# console variable.
addon_player_damage = addon_config.cvar(
    'addon_player_damage', '64',
    'How much damage to cause to each player.', ConVarFlags.CHEAT
)

# I want to add some extra documentation for this variable.
# This creates a comment block called 'Description' right above
# the console command.
addon_player_damage.Description.append(
    'Here is additional documentation on addon_player_damage.')

addon_player_damage.Description.append(
    'Even more documentation.')

# Add in a custom section now. Use the '$' sign to designate
# boundaries.
custom_section = addon_config.section('My custom section', '$')

# Add another variable.
addon_player_model = addon_config.cvar(
    'addon_player_model', 'models/player.mdl',
    'Model to set on the player.', ConVarFlags.CHEAT
)

# Write the configuration file out to the folder.
# Any values modified by the server administrator will
# remain unchanged.
addon_config.write()

This generates the following configuration file:

// ######################################################################### //
//                         Addon configuration file.                         //
// ######################################################################### //

// Description
//   * Here is additional documentation on addon_player_damage.
//   * Even more documentation.
// Default Value: 64
// How much damage to cause to each player.
   addon_player_damage "64"


// $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ //
//                             My custom section                             //
// $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ //

// Default Value: models/player.mdl
// Model to set on the player.
   addon_player_model "models/player.mdl"